#ArtsDay 2018 Recap

 

ArtsBuild Ontario (ABO) was thrilled to take part in Arts Day on the Hill 2018 with the Canadian Arts Coalition this year! Over 100 arts advocates across Canada came together on Tuesday, October 2 to discuss how we can continue to support arts and culture in our communities. Over 100 meetings were scheduled with Members of Parliament, Senators and Ministers.

The Canadian Arts Coalition’s Messages

The Canadian Arts Coalition had five messages to share with the Government of Canada this year:

  • Thank you: The Government of Canada’s support encourages investment from the private sector and from other levels of government, helping to maintain a stable and vibrant creative sector.
  • $30 million annual increase to the Canada Arts Presentation Fund (CAPF): to be phased in over three years. By addressing CAPF, we can take advantage of economies of scale through domestic market opportunities (improves ROI) and enhance export readiness.
  • Continue investing in Canada Council for the Arts: Continued investments through the Canada Council for the Arts, and Canadian Heritage programs, strategically support the creative value chain with positive social and cultural returns.
  • Invest in the Canadian Arts Training Fund and Young Canada Works: with an additional $10 million annually for the Canadian Arts Training Fund, and an additional $500,000 for the Young Canada Works to support diverse artistic proactive and support emerging arts administrators.
  • Help in motivating individual donors through the Canada Cultural Investment Fund: This could take the form of an administrative increase to the Endowment Incentives program to grow the number of Canadians who make charitable donations.

Advocating for Creative Spaces

ArtsBuild Ontario spoke to the importance of all five speaking points, but also spoke to the valuable investments made in the Canada Cultural Spaces Fund (CCSF), creative hubs and cultural infrastructure in both central and rural Ontario communities.

In Budget 2017, the Government of Canada invested $300 million over 10 years in CCSF to further support creative hubs and other cultural spaces. The Canada Cultural Spaces Fund is part of suite of art programs administered by the Department of Canadian Heritage that complements funding delivered by the Canada Council for the Arts.

Our #ArtsDay Team

ArtsBuild Ontario’s Alex Glass was teamed with Lesley Bramhill of the Playwrights’ Workshop Montreal/Canadian Dance Assembly, Janita Grift who is an individual arts administrator/arts advocate, and Robert Steven from the Art Gallery of Burlington. Our team met with Marwan Tabbara, MP for Kitchener-South – Hespeler; Senator Donna Dasko; Zachary Sykes on behalf of Frank Baylis, MP for Pierrefonds-Dollard; and The Honourable Karina Gould, Minister of Democratic Institutions.

We would like to thank the Canadian Arts Coalition for organizing this important and vital day of advocacy for arts and culture!

Read more about #ArtsDay


Announcing the 2018/2019 Learning Series!

 

It’s back! We’re excited to announce our Learning Series is returning this fall with new webinars and a workshop to support arts organizations and their creative spaces. These sessions will provide tools, best practices, and feature guest speakers from the sector to inform and inspire creative space managers.

Many of the webinars in this year’s Learning Series will focus on capital projects and accessibility in creative spaces. Dates for accessibility webinars will be announced later this fall!

Check out our upcoming workshop:

Creative Space Projects: A Brainstorming Workshop 
Facilitator: Lucy White, Principal with the Osbourne Group
Date: Tuesday, November 27, 2018
Time: 10:00 AM – 3:00 PM
Location: Waterloo Region Museum, Classroom A
Cost: $15
Register Here

Check out our upcoming webinars:

Free Webinar: Capital Project Case Study: The Tett Centre
Wednesday, October 31 2018 | 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. EST
Presenters: Nadine Baker, Facility Manager and Danielle Folkerts, Marketing and Programming Coordinator at the Tett Centre
Register Here

Free Webinar: Volunteer Boards and Creative Space Projects
Wednesday, November 28, 2018 | 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. EST
Presenters: 
Kevin Puddister, Curator & General Manager at the Dundas Museum & Archives and John Kastner, General Manager at the Stratford Perth Museum
Register Here

Free Webinar: Engaging Community in Municipal Performing Arts Space Projects 
Wednesday, January 30, 2019 | 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. EST
Presenters: 
Steve Solski, Executive Director at FirstOntario Performing Arts Centre and Kristopher Dell, Director of Production with Civic Theatres Toronto
Register Here

Free Webinar: Alternative Creative Spaces and Adaptive Reuse Projects 
Wednesday, February 27, 2019 | 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. EST
Presenters:
 Kendra Fry, General Manager at Trinity St. Paul’s and Jaime Griffis, Director of Programming and Promotion at Idea Exchange
Register Here

Free Webinar: Working Together: Multi-Partner Creative Space Projects
Wednesday March 27, 2019 | 12:00 – 1:00 p.m. EST
Presenters: Alexandra Badzak, President & CEO of the Ottawa Art Gallery and Tam-Ca Vo-Van, Director of Galerie SAW Gallery
Register Here


Creative Spaces Mentoring Network now accepting applications for mentorship!

 

Calling all arts leaders – grow your professional network and skills needed to execute capital projects, renovations and more with the Creative Spaces Mentoring Network!

About the Program
Through the Creative Spaces Mentoring Network, leaders in Ontario’s arts community who are responsible for their spaces or capital related issues will have access to one-to-one learning with an experienced professional with knowledge and expertise related to their projects.

How it Works
ABO will match mentees with experienced mentors from their own or other relevant sectors. The mentoring teams will meet up to three hours monthly over 12 months to focus on furthering skills and knowledge related to managing the mentee’s creative space project.

Find out more about the Creative Spaces Mentoring Network!

Apply for a mentorship today!
Deadline to apply is Friday, November 16th 2018!


SpaceFinder now available in French for renters!

ArtsBuild Ontario, in partnership with Fractured Atlas, are excited to share that SpaceFinder across Canada is now available to renters in both French and English. We are pleased to offer this resource to artists and creative spaces in both official Canadian languages.

What does this mean for renters? 

This means that users can now search for space in both languages on Canadian SpaceFinder sites, which include:

Alberta York Region
BC Simcoe County
Manitoba Ottawa
Toronto Sudbury
Hamilton Mississauga
Waterloo Region

What this mean for spaces?

Spaces can complete and edit their rentals in both languages!

Have a question?

If you have any questions about SpaceFinder or would like support, please contact infospacefinder@artsbuildontario.ca.

Support is available in both French and English.

SpaceFinder in Canada is made possible by:

ArtsBuild Ontario is grateful for the support of the Department of Canadian Heritage for the translation of SpaceFinder as well as the expansion of SpaceFinder across Canada.


SpaceFinder maintenant accessible aux locataires en français!

ArtsBuild Ontario, en partenariat avec Fractured Atlas, est emballé d’annoncer que partout au Canada, SpaceFinder est maintenant accessible aux locataires en français, sous le nom de RézoAtelier. Nous sommes heureux d’offrir cette ressource aux artistes et aux espaces de création dans les deux langues officielles du pays.

Qu’est-ce que cela signifie pour les locataires?

Cela signifie que les utilisateurs peuvent maintenant rechercher un espace dans les deux langues sur les sites canadiens de SpaceFinder, qui comprennent :

Alberta Région de York
C.-B. Comté de Simcoe
Manitoba Ottawa
Toronto Sudbury
Hamilton Mississauga
Région de Waterloo

Qu’est-ce que cela signifie pour les espaces?

Les espaces peuvent compléter et éditer leurs locations dans les deux langues!

Vous avez des questions?

Si vous avez des questions au sujet de RézoAtelier ou souhaitez du soutien, veuillez communiquer avec infospacefinder@artsbuildontario.ca.

Du soutien est offert en français et en anglais.

RézoAtelier et SpaceFinder au Canada sont rendus possibles grâce à :

ArtsBuild Ontario est reconnaissant du soutien du ministère du Patrimoine canadien pour la traduction de SpaceFinder ainsi que pour son expansion partout au Canada.


ABO Blog: Philadelphia’s Sacred and Creative Spaces Uncovered

 Through support from the Metcalfe Foundation and project leadership of Trinity St. Paul’s and Faith and the Common Good, ArtsBuild Ontario and the Toronto Arts Council travelled to Philadelphia to see how their sacred spaces are evolving to also be creative spaces. Our aim was to investigate how sacred spaces are working with arts organizations to transform their facilities into spaces that also serve the creative community.

Philadelphia was our first city stop in exploring communities outside of Toronto that are adapting or repurposing sacred spaces for artistic use. There are already some examples within the province of sacred spaces working alongside arts organizations in one shared facility. But we wanted to explore how other communities outside of Ontario are approaching this model, how they are thriving and what challenges they are facing. From site visits and meetings with both sacred space administrators and arts organizations, our goal is to better understand where our sacred/creative spaces are headed, in Toronto and across Ontario. We wanted learn how arts organizations and sacred spaces are operating in the same space, exercising respective mandates, and sustaining their practices.

It is not new news that artists and arts organization are actively using sacred spaces for their work. More and more, we are seeing arts organizations hosting performances, rehearsals, workshops and meetings in churches – the space is often available and creatives need it.

Philadelphia has a number of historic structures, including many churches that span from one to two hundred years old. The population is dense and diverse throughout the city’s neighbourhoods. As parish numbers decreased, some churches opened up their doors to other community organizations as well as local arts groups. Other church buildings have become adaptive reuse spaces for artists and arts organizations.

Philadelphia is also the home base for Arts in Sacred Places – a branch of Partners for Sacred Places that brings together artists and arts organizations that need space for rehearsals, studios, performances, offices and other functions with congregations and houses of workshop who have unused or underused space. Through past work with scared spaces in Philadelphia, Arts in Sacred Places took us to a number of churches that are operating both as functioning parishes and arts spaces. They also showed us a few adaptive reuse creative spaces of former churches that have been renovated for arts organizations and entrepreneurs.

While we saw a number of sacred spaces in Philadelphia, we wanted to share three spaces that stood out to us during the trip.

Christ Church Neighborhood House
The Neighborhood House was built by the Christ Church parish in 1915 to serve the residents of the industrial Old City. Eighty years later, local artists seeking unusual, flexible and affordable space discovered the building. Today the Neighborhood House serves cross-disciplinary performing artists, offering subsidized performance and rehearsal rentals. They have a 2000 square foot theatre, a Great Hall, sanctuary, and meeting room available to rent. They have over 50 artists and ensembles using their space each year.

Fleisher Art Memorial
Fleisher Art Memorial is made up four heritage buildings including the St. Martin’s College for Indigent Boys and Church of the Evangelists. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places, Fleisher Art Memorial has fully adapted a church, college and two roadhouses into a nonprofit community art school. The school has studio spaces available to rent, exhibition space which displays student and community works, and a sanctuary that actively houses art programs. The sanctuary is a striking space, with the original walls, stained glass and pulpit  in place from 1884-1886.


Calvary Centre for Culture and Community
The Calvary Centre for Culture and Community is the operating body of the Calvary United Methodist Church. Located in West Philadelphia, the church has positioned itself as a community hub, serving over 5,000 members each year. The church is still active, but after congregation numbers began to decrease, they opened their doors to artists, community organizations and other religious groups to use their facility. They currently use the Chapel as rehearsal and worship space for Jewish, Muslim and Christian groups. Meanwhile, their sanctuary holds a fully erected black box theatre where their resident theatre company rehearses and performs. The rest of the facility provides ample space for rehearsals, twelve steps groups, refugee groups and so much more.

These are just three examples of sacred spaces evolving into creative spaces, and yet they remain diverse in how they operate and who they serve. The biggest commonality in all the spaces we visited in Philadelphia was the strength and sustainability that arts organizations and sacred spaces found in partnership with one another. Rather than go at it alone, we saw churches leverage the space they have by inviting artists and creatives to make a home in their facility – and in most cases, both are helping each other to fulfil a mandate to serve their communities with the arts. We also saw some great examples of former churches that have become adaptive reuse spaces for artists and creatives.

We will be on the road again to other cities outside the province to see how their sacred spaces are incorporating arts and culture within their walls. Following our research, a final report of our findings will be shared with the public.

We look forward to sharing highlights from our next trip in the New Year – stay tuned!